Tag Archives: Delia Owens

“CINEMA” REVIEWS: FRESH (2022) + WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING (2022)

“CINEMA” REVIEWS: FRESH (2022) + WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING (2022)

Two entirely different types of film on the surface, one a black comedy-horror and the other a romantic murder-mystery. Although both feature examples of the female outsider fighting against variant elements of toxic masculinity and the patriarchy. What they also have in common is impressive acting performances from rising star, Daisy Edgar-Jones. Thus, I thought it interesting to review said films side-by-side. With the usual marks out of eleven.

*** MAY CONTAIN SPOILERS ***


FRESH (2022)

Directed by Mimi Cave

Written by Lauryn Kahn

Main cast: Daisy Edgar-Jones, Sebastian Stan, Jonica T Gibbs, Charlotte Le Bon, Andrea Bang etc.

Essentially a beat-by-beat replica of Get Out (2017) as the main protagonist finds themself under threat from a nefarious force as their best friend desperately seeks to rescue them from grisly danger. Rather than raising important points about racism within the horror genre, Mimi Cave’s deliciously directed horror story with comedic elements, explores the precarious threat of singledom, toxic masculinity, gastronomy and relationships.

Daisy Edgar-Jones portrays cynical twenty-something, Noa, who is sick of the dating game and feels isolated where romance is concerned. I empathised with her decision to remain single, but then she has a meat cute with likeable charmer, Steve (Sebastian Stan), in the supermarket. They go on a date and more than hit-it-off. Before you can say “no-don’t-go-away-for-the-weekend-with-a-man-you-hardly-know!” Noa goes away with Steve and the plot ingredients really come to the boil.

Sebastian Stan and Daisy Edgar-Jones have fine chemistry throughout and are attractive protagonists. The first half of the film builds raw suspense, before the revelation arguably over-cooks the central relationship on the menu. Providing excellent support to the leads is Noa’s bestie, Mollie (Jonica T. Gibbs), who turns detective to locate Noa before the knives come out for her. Fresh (2022) runs out of steam toward the end as the plotting unravels with the characters making dumb horror movie decisions. However, I really want to see what writer, Lauren Kahn and director, Mimi Cave, deliver next as their debut feature Fresh (2022) is a very tasty starter.

Mark: 8 out of 11



WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING (2022)

Directed by Olivia Newman

Screenplay by Lucy Alibar (Based on Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens)


Main cast: Daisy Edgar-Jones, Taylor John Smith, Harris Dickinson, Michael Hyatt, Sterling Macer, Jr., David Strathairn etc.

Adapted from the best-selling phenomenon written by Delia Owens, I went into Where the Crawdads Sing (2022) cold without any prior knowledge of the story. I hadn’t read the novel and even the trailer, thankfully, didn’t give swathes of plot away when I saw it. But what’s it all about? Well, it’s a sprawling cake mix of genres including murder-mystery, court drama, period piece, romance, and rites-of-passage with a movie-of-the-week cherry on top feel.

Daisy Edgar-Jones sensitively portrays Kya Clark, a young girl living in the North Carolina marsh, dealing with all manner of drama and trouble throughout her life. Considered an outcast and weirdo by the town locals of Barkley Cove, the film quickly places Kya as the main suspect in the murder of a privileged jock, Chase Andrews (Harris Dickinson). Via flashbacks we are then introduced to the misery of Kya’s abusive childhood, with her father frightening away Kya’s mother and brothers with his drunken battery. When Kya is ultimately abandoned by everyone, she finds some solace in her fledgling romance with Tate Walker (Taylor John Smith) and her interest in wildlife and art.

There are many elements of Where the Crawdads Sing (2022) that felt extremely familiar, notably the Nicholas Sparks-inspired love triangle. Kya having to choose between generic good boy/bad boy types. However, it is integral to the character-driven aspect of Kya growing from a shy caterpillar and blossoming into a radiant butterfly. While the arguably patronising characterisation of the black characters did not convince, Kya’s character arc is certainly compelling, thanks to Edgar-Jones intelligent performance. Moreover, I enjoyed the locations and some wonderful scenery too. Overall, while it is undemanding and generic, I found Where the Crawdads Sing (2022) a pleasing diversion with a couple of obvious, but decent twists in the tale. The kind of film my mum would love.

Mark: 6.5 out of 11