Tag Archives: Taylor Russell

CINEMA REVIEW: BONES AND ALL (2022)

CINEMA REVIEW: BONES AND ALL (2022)

Directed by Luca Guadagnino

Screenplay by David Kajganich

Based on Bones & All by Camille DeAngelis

Produced by: Luca Guadagnino, Theresa Park, Marco Morabito, David Kajganich, Francesco Melzi d’Eril, Lorenzo Mieli, Gabriele Moratti, Peter Spears, Timothée Chalamet

Cast: Taylor Russell, Timothée Chalamet, Michael Stuhlbarg, André Holland, Chloë Sevigny, David Gordon Green, Jessica Harper, Jake Horowitz, Mark Rylance, etc.

Cinematography: Arseni Khachaturan

*** CONTAINS STORY SPOILERS ***



After reviewing The Menu (2022) last time out, here’s another film where food and eating and death are at the very marrow of the narrative. I must confess though it’s very difficult to discuss the excellent hybrid genre film, Bones and All (2022) without giving away the main ingredient within this film. So, I give prior warning that I’m going to have to reveal it in the review. I will state therefore if this film had been called, Fine Young Cannibals, I would not have been surprised in the least. Because the theme of people eating human meat is at the heart of the story.

Bones and All (2022) is not a B-movie zombie film with bloody images of flesh-eating monsters devouring people. Yes, there are some gory scenes to satisfy horror fans, however, this arthouse adaptation of Camille DeAngelis’ 2016 novel, is more subtle and sympathetic to the young protagonists with a yearning for mortal flesh. Here murder and cannibalism occur, but it is represented as a curse for both Maren (Taylor Russell) and Lee (Timothee Chalamet), who struggle with their consumptive urges. Moreover, the feeding on flesh is highly symbolic, representing a sensual and almost religious experience for the couple. As they travel across various States, they grow as characters and people. They also explore their own love and share other people’s bodies, romance bleeding through in the process.



Bones and All (2022) is set in the 1980s. It begins with teenager Maren living with her father (Andre Holland) in Virginia. After hitting eighteen years of age, and causing a particularly nasty event at a friend’s sleepover, she is abandoned by him. Left with a cassette tape explaining her family history, Maren sets out to find her mother, meeting Lee along the way. The two are immediately drawn to each other and while driving set about sating their desire for fresh meat. This causes conflict between the couple as it is clear they are not comfortable with the nasty business of killing. Unlike the pursuing serial-killer-trophy-collecting antagonist, Sully (Mark Rylance). He is a venal force of nature, taking animalistic glee during the sacrifice of his victims.

Bones and All (2022) is directed with glacial majesty by Luca Guadagnino. He expertly blends and cooks the genres of horror, period drama, rites-of-passage, romance and road movie with a well balanced approach to tone. Extracting attractive performances from Chalamet and Russell, their onscreen chemistry is potent and touching. Acting legend Mark Rylance steals the show though as the slithery Sully. Overall, I felt the film could have been cut for pace slightly and the Romeo and Juliet-with-a-twist ending was too tragic for me. I think, despite their cannibalistic needs, Maren and Lee deserved a future together. But ultimately it’s all a matter of taste.

Mark: 8 out of 11


FILMS THAT GOT AWAY #11 – WAVES (2019)

FILMS THAT GOT AWAY #11 – WAVES (2019)

Directed by: Trey Edward Shults

Produced by: Kevin Turen, Jessica Row, Trey Edward Shults

Written by: Trey Edward Shults

Cast: Kelvin Harrison Jr., Lucas Hedges, Taylor Russell, Alexa Demie, Renée Elise Goldsberry, Sterling K. Brown, Alexa Demie, Clifton Collins Jr., Vivi Pineda, etc.

Music by: Trent Reznor, Atticus Ross

Cinematography: Drew Daniels

*** MAY CONTAIN SPOILERS ***



“First your parents, they give you your life, but then they try to give you their life.”

― Chuck Palahniuk


Being a parent is an extremely difficult job and mostly impossible to get right. It is a rewarding and joyous experience, but can also be a frustrating one. Raising another human being in this world is a fluid and ever-shifting set of tasks. Once you have got past a certain age and seemingly resolved the issues of that time, their next period of growth provides a whole different set of puzzles. Whatever books you read or advice you take, or help you get, you will never be prepared enough to meet the challenge of being a parent. Even those who have had more than one child can attest that what occurred with the first child will not be the same for the next or the next after that. Every individual being is different and will have a varied set of intricacies.

In the majestic family drama, Waves (2019), for example, Ronald (Sterling K. Brown) and Catherine Williams (Renee Elise Goldsbery), are middle-class parents with successful jobs who provide a fabulous Florida home and upbringing to their teenage children. Their son, Tyler (Kelvin Harrison Jnr.), is smart, athletic and a popular student, while their younger daughter, Emily, is quieter but equally bright. Ronald pushes Tyler to excel in every way, in study, work and on the wrestling team. He’s doing it with best intentions, but it creates incredible pressure for the lad. So much so, when Tyler suffers a serious injury and a problematic romantic situation he mentally and emotionally breaks.



Waves (2019)

This is a tale of two children and their parents attempts to raise, guide and control them. Not control in a negative fashion, but out of love and desire to see they are on the correct path in life. But what the narrative illustrates is that even the most loving and comfortable families can have tragedy bestowed upon them via a mixture of spontaneously poor life choices, youthful emotional imbalance and the fickle finger of fate. Thus, some could argue that with subjects such as unwanted pregnancy, pushy parents and rebellious teenagers, the film is over-familiar and melodramatic in places. However, the acting, direction and cinematography render the film wholly cinematic. Special mention to the extremely talented cinematographer Drew Daniels, who also lit HBO’s stylish mini-series Euphoria (2019). The production’s choice of colour, lighting, lens differentiation and aspect ratio switches are another reason this fabulous film impacted me so much.

No disrespect intended to the films nominated for Best Picture at the last Academy Awards, but how Waves (2019) did not get on that list is beyond me. Maybe it didn’t qualify due to some technicality, but it was definitely one of the best films of last year. It’s a shame I missed it as Trey Edward Schults proves he is a formidable young director. Sterling K. Hayden is impressive as the father who thinks he knows best, but is ultimately as emotionally lost as his son. Taylor Russell as Emily is an absolute shining star in the role and Kelvin Harrison Jnr. is, following his mesmerising performance in Luce (2019), destined for great things. Lastly, I’m not sure how Waves (2019) got away from me on release, but I’m glad I finally caught up with this searing and complex drama.

Mark: 9 out of 11