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THE INVISIBLE MAN (2020) – MOVIE REVIEW

THE INVISIBLE MAN (2020)

Directed by: Leigh Whannell

Screenplay by Leigh Whannell – based on H. G. Wells The Invisible Man

Produced by: Jason Blum, Kylie du Fresne

Main cast: Elisabeth Moss, Aldis Hodge, Storm Reid, Harriet Dyer, Oliver Jackson-Cohen, Michael Dorman,

Music: Benjamin Wallfisch

Cinematography: Stefan Duscio

***MAY CONTAIN SPOILERS***



Many a work, home, pub, dinner party and school conversation has started with the following question: what would YOU do if you were invisible? Depending on the company it’s something that can descend into wild fantasy territory. Being invisible will allow you the freedom to spy and become the ultimate voyeur. You could also become a criminal and creep into places without being seen to thieve. You could be a prankster and play tricks on your friends and family. You could become a superhero, battle crime and help people. You could simply just disappear not just literally, but philosophically from society. The possibilities are endless.

H. G. Wells original novel is an absolute genre masterpiece. Arguably the most famous version was filmed in 1933 with incredible practical effects and an exceptional performance from Claude Rains. In this new version the conventional invisible scientist-goes-mad story is twisted successfully into an exhilarating horror suspense film with themes relating to toxic masculinity and abusive relationships. Here invisibility is used to control and instil fear, as the recently deceased Griffin (Oliver Jackson-Cohen) is, according to his ex-partner, Cecilia (Elisabeth Moss), targeting her from the grave.


Image result for the invisible man 2020 scenes

Leigh Whannell has great experience writing and producing low-budget horror films including: Saw (2004) and Insidious (2010). His last directorial release, Upgrade (2018), was a fantastic mix of 1980’s B-movies, sci-fi and horror cinema. Building on the crowd-pleasing thrills of Upgrade, Whannell has crafted a paranoiac classic with Elisabeth Moss giving a fantastically nerve-shredding and physically adept performance. From the tense opening scene, we empathise with her desire to escape a controlling and malevolent force. Building slowly throughout the first act, Whannell’s script brilliantly picks up the pace and plots Cecilia’s descent into a living hell. Consequently, Cecilia’s anxiety reaches peak stress as no one believes she is being set up by a gas-lighting, unseen and venal monster.

It pays to see this film on the big screen with the finest sound quality available. I watched it on an IMAX screen where the sound design and Benjamin Wallfisch’s amazing score really enhance the fear-inducing visuals. How the production team made this film for a reported $7 million dollars is beyond me. Yet, Whannell is an economical and highly efficient filmmaker. His writing is lean and mean, as the script is full of fantastic set-pieces and plot reversals. Moreover, the story is very relevant, exploring the themes of the day relating to domestic abuse, depression and mental illness. However, it’s not an overbearing message movie, but rather a smart and surprising thriller.

Overall, The Invisible Man (2020) starts strongly and proceeds to deliver a series of gripping and, at times, heart-in-the-mouth cinematic moments. There are none of the usual scientific and over-expositional set-ups that can slow down such films. The visuals, sound, score and performances deliver the story most effectively. I felt like there were a few fuzzy plot moments that Whannell could have explained in more detail, however, that could have hindered the pace of the story. Finally, with Elisabeth Moss imbuing her character with resilience, energy and steel, we get an individual who will never give up. She sees through her ghosting nemesis and will fight to the last breath to prove her innocence and remain in control.

Mark: 9 out of 11


5 REASONS THIS COULD BE GOOD – THE INVISIBLE MAN (2020)

5 REASONS THIS COULD BE GOOD – THE INVISIBLE MAN (2020)

Directed by: Leigh Whannell

Screenplay by Leigh Whannell – based on H. G. Wells The Invisible Man

Produced by: Jason Blum, Kylie du Fresne

Main cast: Elisabeth Moss, Aldis Hodge, Storm Reid, Harriet Dyer, Oliver Jackson-Cohen

UK Release date: 28th February 2020

*****SPOILER FREE*****



THE INVISIBLE MAN (2020)

A contemporary version of the science fiction classic The Invisible Man has been made. Here are five reasons it could be good.

1. LEIGH WHANNELL

Whannell has great experience writing and producing low-budget horror films including: Saw (2004) and Insidious (2010). His directorial debut Upgrade (2018) was a fantastic mix of 1980’s, sci-fi and horror movies. I loved it and it proved to be one of my favourite films of 2018.

2. ELISABETH MOSS

Elisabeth Moss is one of the best actresses around as she has proved with her brilliant work in television classics Mad Men and The Handmaid’s Tale. Moss is now breaking out in cinematic releases and proved she excels in horror having starred in Jordan Peele’s frightening film Us (2019).

3. BLUMHOUSE PRODUCTIONS

The prolific Blumhouse Productions certainly turn out a lot of product each year. Their modus operandi is to keep film budgets low in order to maximise profits on release. You could be forgiven for thinking Jason Blum greenlights just cheap exploitation films, however, Whiplash (2014) The Gift (2015), Split (2016), Get Out (2017), BlackKklansman (2018) and Us (2019) transcend the low-budget model to provide excellent cinematic experiences.

4. BASED ON A LITERARY CLASSIC

H. G. Wells original novel is an absolute genre masterpiece. It has been made, remade, re-imagined and re-booted in horror, comedy, thriller and romance genres. Arguably the most famous version was filmed in 1933 with incredible practical effects and an exceptional performance from Claude Rains. In this new version the conventional scientist-goes-mad following successful experimentation into invisibility remains, but he now seems to be targeting Elisabeth Moss’s character.

5. THEMES

The trailer reveals a slightly conventional female-protagonist-as-victim narrative. But I expect Leigh Whannell will have a number of twists and surprises up his sleeve. Indeed, science fiction and invisibility are ripe for the exploration of themes relating to toxic masculinity and hidden identity. Either that or it will simply be a fun, scary and suspenseful experience in the hands of the reliable Whannell.