Tag Archives: Movies

5 REASONS THIS COULD BE GOOD – THE INVISIBLE MAN (2020)

5 REASONS THIS COULD BE GOOD – THE INVISIBLE MAN (2020)

Directed by: Leigh Whannell

Screenplay by Leigh Whannell – based on H. G. Wells The Invisible Man

Produced by: Jason Blum, Kylie du Fresne

Main cast: Elisabeth Moss, Aldis Hodge, Storm Reid, Harriet Dyer, Oliver Jackson-Cohen

UK Release date: 28th February 2020

*****SPOILER FREE*****



THE INVISIBLE MAN (2020)

A contemporary version of the science fiction classic The Invisible Man has been made. Here are five reasons it could be good.

1. LEIGH WHANNELL

Whannell has great experience writing and producing low-budget horror films including: Saw (2004) and Insidious (2010). His directorial debut Upgrade (2018) was a fantastic mix of 1980’s, sci-fi and horror movies. I loved it and it proved to be one of my favourite films of 2018.

2. ELISABETH MOSS

Elisabeth Moss is one of the best actresses around as she has proved with her brilliant work in television classics Mad Men and The Handmaid’s Tale. Moss is now breaking out in cinematic releases and proved she excels in horror having starred in Jordan Peele’s frightening film Us (2019).

3. BLUMHOUSE PRODUCTIONS

The prolific Blumhouse Productions certainly turn out a lot of product each year. Their modus operandi is to keep film budgets low in order to maximise profits on release. You could be forgiven for thinking Jason Blum greenlights just cheap exploitation films, however, Whiplash (2014) The Gift (2015), Split (2016), Get Out (2017), BlackKklansman (2018) and Us (2019) transcend the low-budget model to provide excellent cinematic experiences.

4. BASED ON A LITERARY CLASSIC

H. G. Wells original novel is an absolute genre masterpiece. It has been made, remade, re-imagined and re-booted in horror, comedy, thriller and romance genres. Arguably the most famous version was filmed in 1933 with incredible practical effects and an exceptional performance from Claude Rains. In this new version the conventional scientist-goes-mad following successful experimentation into invisibility remains, but he now seems to be targeting Elisabeth Moss’s character.

5. THEMES

The trailer reveals a slightly conventional female-protagonist-as-victim narrative. But I expect Leigh Whannell will have a number of twists and surprises up his sleeve. Indeed, science fiction and invisibility are ripe for the exploration of themes relating to toxic masculinity and hidden identity. Either that or it will simply be a fun, scary and suspenseful experience in the hands of the reliable Whannell.


SIX OF THE BEST #23 – FILMS ABOUT FILMMAKING

SIX OF THE BEST #23 – FILMS ABOUT FILMMAKING

It’s no surprise there are an abundance of films about the actual process of filmmaking. Firstly, if you follow the idea of “writing what you know” literally, a filmmaker, screenwriter or director will certainly have first hand experience of this. Secondly, and most importantly, is that the film industry is full of rich possibilities in terms of drama, action, tragedy, romance and comedy. Lastly, cinema down the years is replete with imaginative, tough, evil, spoilt, egotistical, eccentric and frankly insane individuals working in the film industry.

Therefore, over the course of cinematic history there have been many great films about the movie-making business. I personally love the sub-genre and probably could’ve have chosen a top twenty. Indeed, the following could also have been picked too: 8 1/2 (1963), Dolemite is My Name (2019), Shadow of the Vampire (2000), Sullivan’s Travels (1941), Barton Fink (1991), State and Main (2000), Once Upon A Time In Hollywood (2019), Hugo (2011), Living In Oblivion (1995) etc. However, as is the case with this feature, I’ve selected just six of the best.

**CONTAINS SPOILERS**



BOOGIE NIGHTS (1997)

“Wait a minute. You come into my house, my party, to tell me about the future? That the future is tape, videotape, and not film? That it’s amateurs and not professionals? I’m a filmmaker, which is why I will never make a movie on tape.” Jack Horner

Mark Wahlberg, Burt Reynolds, Ricky Jay, and Jack Wallace in Boogie Nights (1997)

THE DISASTER ARTIST (2017)

“Not closed set. Open set. Life is not closed set! I want everyone to see!” Tommy Wiseau

James Franco in The Disaster Artist (2017)

ED WOOD (1994)

“Really? Worst film you ever saw. Well, my next one will be better. Hello. Hello.” Ed Wood

Johnny Depp in Ed Wood (1994)

THE PLAYER (1992)

“I was just thinking what an interesting concept it is to eliminate the writer from the artistic process. If we could just get rid of these actors and directors, maybe we’ve got something here.” Griffin Mill


SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN (1952)

“Why bother to shoot this film? Why not release the old one under a new title? You’ve seen one, you’ve seen them all.” Cosmo Brown

Singin' in the Rain (1952)

TROPIC THUNDER (2008)

“First, take a big step back… and literally, FUCK YOUR OWN FACE! I don’t know what kind of pan-pacific bullshit power play you’re trying to pull here, but Asia Jack is my territory. So whatever you’re thinking, you’d better think again!” Les Grossman

Robert Downey Jr., Ben Stiller, Jay Baruchel, Jack Black, and Brandon T. Jackson in Tropic Thunder (2008)

THE CINEMA FIX PRESENTS – TWELVE FAVOURITE FILMS OF 2019!

THE CINEMA FIX PRESENTS – TWELVE FAVOURITE FILMS OF 2019!

Hello 2020!

So, here are my TWELVE FAVOURITE FILMS I watched last year at the cinema, at film festivals and on streaming platforms such as Netflix, Curzon and Amazon etc.!

It was another very good year full of entertaining and thought-provoking cinema. If I have missed any films out it’s because I did not enjoy them as much as you — or have not seen them yet. If I have missed any must-see films then please point out any glaring omissions.


Image result for blackkklansman poster

For comparison here are my FAVOURITE FILMS OF 2018:

  • A Quiet Place (2018)
  • A Star is Born (2018)
  • BlacKKKlansman (2018)
  • The Favourite (2018)
  • First Reformed (2018)
  • First Man (2018)
  • Game Night (2018)
  • Peterloo (2018)
  • Phantom Thread (2017)
  • Sorry To Bother You (2018)
  • The Shape of Water (2017)
  • Upgrade (2018)

12 FAVOURITE FILMS OF 2019

So, here are the films I enjoyed watching most of all last year. Films I also really liked but narrowly miss out on this list are: Doctor Sleep (2019), Green Book (2018), Harriet (2019), Little Women (2019), Paddleton (2019), Ready or Not (2019), The Report (2019) and Vice (2018).


AD ASTRA (2019)

“James Gray’s existential space epic finds Brad Pitt journeying into the abyss of space with tremendous results.


AVENGERS: ENDGAME (2019)

“…the Marvel production team deserve so much credit for bringing this multi-stranded story home in such a thrilling fashion.”


CAPERNAUM (2018)

“…With incredible scenes of documentary realism the director Nadine Labaki has delivered a powerful piece of cinema.”


DOLEMITE IS MY NAME (2019)

“… it’s a testament to the ability, talent and infectiousness of Eddie Murphy. Comedian and B-movie star, Rudy Ray Moore, is a part he was born to play.”


THE FAREWELL (2019)

“… Awkwafina provides subtle brilliance in her role as Billi, yet, Zhao Shuzhen steals the show as the effervescent Nai-Nai in this funny and moving drama.”


THE IRISHMAN (2019)

“… Netflix have an absolute monster of a gangster film here, with Scorsese once again delivering a very special cinematic offering.”


JOJO RABBIT (2019)

“… Taika Waititi just manages to balance parody and pathos in this risky, but brilliant rites-of-passage comedy-war film.”

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is jojo-rabbit-trailer.jpg

JOKER (2019)

“… marrying Taxi Driver (1976) with a DC comic-book super-villain is a masterstroke; making it one of the most compelling films of 2019.”


KNIVES OUT (2019)

“… Rian Johnson is back on the form with this breathless murder mystery, which works brilliantly as fast-paced, witty and intricate film entertainment.”


MARRIAGE STORY (2019)

“… an emotional and funny relationship drama that’s full of standout scenes, with Adam Driver and Scarlett Johansson on top form.”


ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD (2019)

“… a near three-hour arthouse classic, especially if you like films about film and TV making, driving, feet, cinema-going, Los Angeles, more feet; and hanging with the marvellous DiCaprio and Pitt.”


US (2019)

… Jordan Peele skilfully delivers another great horror film, thanks to clever writing, masterful film production and an incredible cast.”


MEMORABLE FILM CHARACTERS #2 – KING KONG

MEMORABLE FILM CHARACTERS #2 – KING KONG



**CONTAINS SPOILERS**


In the second of this series which looks at great film characters, I want to explore one of the most memorable monsters of all time: King Kong! In this short piece I will consider the original classic film creation in RKO’s King Kong (1933). It’s fascinating to examine the technical feats required to bring the character to the screen, the characterisation and narrative aspects which make Kong so memorable; and finally, the sociological and cultural impact of the film.

Working with a story by mystery writer Edgar Wallace and co-director Merian C. Cooper, the script was developed in 1932 by James Creelman and Ruth Rose. They structured this big adventure around filmmaker, Carl Denham, and his obsessive desire to shoot the legendary Kong on the ominously named Skull Island. What follows is a film of spectacular power and great innovation. In order to create Kong and the other prehistoric creatures the production team developed groundbreaking techniques such as stop-motion, rear projection, matte painting and miniatures. To this day the effects are breathtaking and still more emotionally engaging than most modern CGI.



As well as the incredible stop-motion photography painstakingly rendered by Willis O’Brien and Buzz Gibson’s team, the character of Kong is quite unique. Here is a monster in a horror B-movie who is in fact the most sympathetic character of the whole film. Moreover, the script builds suspense and dread with a long wait before we even see Kong. And what a sight it is! At first it would seem he is a merely a large ape, but he is revered as a god and protector. However, it is the humans who are the actual monsters. They steal Kong from his natural habitat and proceed to shackle him and treat him like an exhibit. But this exhibit has teeth and is about to bite back.

On release and in more recent years King Kong (1933) has rightly received much critical praise. It’s often ranked in the top horror films and all-time favourite 100 films of all time. More importantly, it’s actually gained attention as a film that subtextually reflects notions of colonialism, racism and the slave trade. In Quentin Tarantino’s superb revisionist war film, Inglourious Basterds (2009), a Nazi Officer reflects on this issue with specific reference to Kong. Similarly in this fantastic article, From Spectacle to Elegy: The Cinematic Myth of King Kong, Ross Langager, opines eloquently on the power of King Kong (1933) even now. Thus, while he may be a model made from clay, paint and metal, rendered real by the magic of cinema, Kong’s character is so much more than the sum of his parts. He is not simply a monster, but the ultimate tragic hero.


ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD (2019) – FILM REVIEW – A $90 MILLION “ARTHOUSE” & FETISHISTIC CLASSIC!

ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD (2019) – FILM REVIEW

Directed and Written by: Quentin Tarantino

Produced by: David Heyman, Shannon McIntosh, Quentin Tarantino

Cast: Leonardo DiCaprio, Brad Pitt, Margot Robbie, Emile Hirsch, Timothy Olyphant, Margaret Qualley, Austin Butler, Al Pacino, Mike Moh, Bruce Dern, Dakota Fanning, Damien Lewis, Kurt Russell and many, many more.

Cinematography: Robert Richardson

**MAY CONTAIN SPOILERS**

From watching the trailers for Quentin Tarantino’s ninth film, Once Upon A Time in Hollywood (2019), I remember thinking: this looks so cool and I’m glad they haven’t given away much of the story here. Because, I hate those darned trailers which give away the story!

So, you watch Quentin Tarantino’s ninth film and then you realise, after the excessive running time, THERE ISN’T REALLY ANY STORY as such! Okay, DiCaprio’s character suffers an existential career crisis but that’s kind of it. Instead, you get mostly a nigh-on three-hour historical and cultural nostalgia trip down memory lane filtered through the artistic and fetishistic vision of one of cinemas great filmmaking iconoclasts.

Once Upon A Time in Hollywood (2019), is essentially an arthouse character study where you get to hang out with two-and-a-half lead protagonists, plus a whole army of fictional and ‘real’ life supporting characters from the 1969 Hollywood era. Our two main “heroes” are neurotic, alcoholic B-movie actor, Rick Dalton (Leonardo DiCaprio), and tough, handsome and laconic, Cliff Booth (Brad Pitt). The two characters contrast and complement each other perfectly. Moreover, the star quality, chemistry and fine performances of the lead actors bind the movie together amazingly.

Brad Pitt is especially brilliant. His character is not, until the violent ending, given much to do story wise; however, he does it with such charm. He imbues a character who has accepted his place in the world with such easy-going humour and control, it is an absolute joy to watch. It’s an iceberg performance which seems shallow on the surface, but has hidden and unsaid depth. I really wanted to know more about his character, especially what appeared to be a very colourful backstory.

DiCaprio, on the other hand, has the showier performance. Edgy, hungover and insecure due to his characters’ fading Hollywood career, DiCaprio gives another fantastic movie performance. He commits to the Dalton character and features in some wonderful sketches which pay homage and parody B-movies, TV variety shows and old TV Westerns. What I loved was his ability to demonstrate different levels of acting skills. DiCaprio can fuck up Dalton’s acting on set one moment, but then deliver acting on a Shakespearean level the next.

Margot Robbie, who we know is a brilliant actor in her own right, alas, is not afforded the same level of care in regard to the characterisation of Sharon Tate. More of an ornamental character in the film, she looks great going to the cinema, packing a suitcase, driving and generally just being effervescent. Yet, it’s truly is one of the film’s major flaws that it doesn’t make more of Robbie’s acting talent. Even the fantastic ending, which Tarantino, takes incredible liberties with in regard to actual events, finds Tate’s character development unfortunately left bereft of emotion.

Similarly, the Hollywood cameos echoing throughout the films are pure style over substance. For example Steve McQueen, Roman Polanski and Bruce Lee feature but these are mostly inconsequential encounters. The Bruce Lee representation and scene is actually really funny as Cliff Booth and the martial arts star face off in a hilarious flashback. Typically, Tarantino has caused controversy with his Bruce Lee (Mike Moh) rendition. Personally, I respect that people may be offended, however, it’s more comedic and iconoclastic rather than overt racism. After all, this is a fairy-tale vision of Hollywood and not a documentary. Plus, Tarantino knows he’s going to piss people off so it’s obvious he’s playing with people here.

While Bruce Lee’s persona is playfully satirized or racist depending on your point-of-view, Tarantino’s representation of the Manson family is more damning. It’s clear he absolutely hates hippies, especially acid-looped killer hippies. Dalton and Booth represent the old-school, honest Hollywood working class, so are the antithesis of the drop-out youths. The culture clashes between this era and the new flower-power cults is something Tarantino explores. Charles Manson, who barely features, is a ghost-like figure though. Instead, it is the character of Tex (Austin Butler) and the females of the commune who are most prominent.

Margaret Qualley as Pussycat is especially hypnotic in her role. Exuding both sexuality and acid-drenched nihilism, Pussycat is a siren hitcher, luring drivers to symbolically crash against the cliffs. For me, Tarantino should have made way more of the old and new California culture clash themes, as they resonated powerfully when on screen. Plus, the scenes on the commune were actually quite creepy, so more should have been made of this threat from a dramatic perspective. Lastly, the irreverent and violent final act carnage exploits the clashing of these two different cultures, but more could have done throughout to enhance this dynamic.

Overall, Once Upon A Time In Hollywood (2019) is a near three-hour arthouse classic. If you like films about film and TV making, driving, feet, ensemble casts, films within films, cinema-going, Los Angeles, more feet; and hanging with the marvellous DiCaprio and Pitt in a 1969 setting, then you will love this beautifully rendered and lovingly crafted film about Hollywood. Otherwise, you will probably find it a boring, indulgent and style-over-substance folly. Either way you have to admire Tarantino’s exquisitely controlled writing and direction. He certainly does!!

Safe to say though Tarantino will not care either way, because most of his filmic output has made a lot of money at the box office. This has now allowed him the luxury, like that of true cinema artists such as Kubrick, Altman and Antonioni, to make whatever films a studio is prepared to give him the money for. He’s basically making films for himself and doesn’t care if the audience likes it or not.

I personally found myself magnetically drawn to Tarantino’s vision and from a purely filmmaking and artistic perspective I was totally immersed throughout. Having said that, if the incessant driving and shots of dirty feet were cut and Dalton and Booth had been given a proper plot, rather than the thin stranded narrative within the impressive gallery of cameos and set-pieces, I would definitely expect to be writing about one of the best films ever made.

Mark: 9.5 out of 11

GREAT ENSEMBLE FILM CASTS #2

GREAT ENSEMBLE FILM CASTS #2

Way back in September 2015 I wrote an article listing some great ensemble film casts. Please feel free to read it here at this link.

If you can’t be bothered to read it the list of films are as follows:

12 ANGRY MEN (1957)
AVENGERS ASSEMBLE (2012)
GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL (2014)
INCEPTION (2010)
LA CONFIDENTIAL (1997)
THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN (1960)
MAGNOLIA (1999)
MEANTIME (1984)
THE OUTSIDERS (1983)
PULP FICTION (1994)
SHORT CUTS (1993)
TINKER, TAILOR, SOLDIER, SPY (2011)

Never one to worry about originality, I have decided to follow up this article with another list of great ensemble film casts.

The challenge second time round though is to EXCLUDE the films of directors or franchises ALREADY LISTED.

For those who may have lazy-read this I WILL REPEAT!!!

NO DIRECTOR’S OR FRANCHISE WORK FROM LIST ONE WILL BE ON LIST TWO!!!

It would be so easy to include all of Paul Thomas Anderson, Quentin Tarantino’s or the Marvel films. So I am not going to do that. Anyway, here are another TEN films with great ensemble casts (in alphabetical order).

ANCHORMAN: THE LEGEND OF RON BURGUNDY (2004)

AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY (2013)

THE DIRTY DOZEN (1967)

GOSFORD PARK (2001)

THE GREAT ESCAPE (1963)

HAIL CAESAR (2016)

LORD OF THE RINGS: FELLOWSHIP OF THE RINGS (2001)

SUICIDE SQUAD (2016)

THE WILD BUNCH (1969)

THE WOLF OF WALL STREET (2014)

SIX OF THE BEST #18 – FILM ANTHOLOGIES

SIX OF THE BEST #18 – FILM ANTHOLOGIES

While we all love a good proper feature film containing one continuous narrative, the anthology or portmanteau film has thrown up some fine cinematic entertainment over the years. Generally, an anthology film can be described as a collection of works with a linked theme, genre, style and author etc.

Thus, in my occasional Six of the Best series I have decided to pick some favourite ones. To make it more interesting I have chosen them from different genres. Otherwise, I would have just chosen all horror films. So, here are six of the film anthology films worth watching.

**MAY CONTAIN SPOILERS**


THE BALLAD OF BUSTER SCRUGGS (2018) – WESTERN

The Ballad of Buster Scruggs is a mischievous alchemy of stories. Here, the Coen Brothers reach into their cinematic bag of tricks to deliver an entertaining and memorable collection of characters, songs, bloody death, jokes, pathos, landscapes, snappy dialogue, dark humour and action. Coen’s films often improve with each viewing as their work is so full of stylish depth and this is no different. Quite often, you’re laughing so much you miss the philosophical happenstance which is occurring in many of these fine stories.

Image result for buster scruggs

DEAD OF NIGHT (1945) – HORROR

It seems sacrilege not to include the likes of George Romero’s Creepshow (1982) or one of Amicus’ unhinged collections such as Dr Terror’s House of Horror (1965). But, having watched this classic recently I can certainly say it has some brilliant and scary stories which stand the test of time. Full to the brim with the cream of British acting, writing and directing talent, the standout tale is Michael Redgrave’s troubled ventriloquist, although the whole film is a nightmarish treat for horror fans.

Image result for DEAD OF NIGHT

FANTASIA (1940) – ANIMATION

With the current trend for Disney to remake their back catalogue as “live” action films in mind, I very much doubt they will doing this with Fantasia. Conceived as a short to re-invigorate the slowing career of Mickey Mouse, the film is unlike any other Disney have made. It consists of experimental, non-narrative and hallucinogenic vignettes mainly set to wondrous classical music. A masterpiece of hand-drawn animation, style, colour and design, it’s certainly not just for kids. I recall many images giving me nightmares when saw it as a child and it remains a powerful cinematic work to this day.

Image result for fantasia

NIGHT ON EARTH (1991) – COMEDY

I was going to choose Woody Allen’s erotic sketch film, Everything You Wanted to Ask About Sex but were Afraid to Ask (1972), for the comedy section. However, I decided to select a more deadpan and character oriented film. What better then, than a Jim Jarmusch curiosity. I love the concept of the film as Jarmusch sets several themes and parameters in place. There are five slice-of-life vignettes set on the same night in the cities of Helsinki, New York, Rome, Paris and Los Angeles, all starring some of Jarmusch’s favourite actors. Relationships and quirky interactions between cab driver and passenger are explored in the filmmakers’ inimitable style.


PULP FICTION (1994) – CRIME

Quentin Tarantino’s second feature film remains a fresh masterpiece of colliding gangsters, uber-cool hitmen, fixers, boxers, sexual deviants, femme fatales, drug addicts and general criminal types. With an over-lapping timeline that kind of does a figure of eight, we get stories ranging from a couple robbing a diner; a boxer double-crossing a crime boss; and an employee almost killing his boss’s wife. Tarantino breathes life into the crime genre and the stock pulp characters with one of the greatest screenplays ever written; full of incredible dialogue, startling twists and a brilliant ensemble cast.


WILD TALES (2014) – DRAMA

Damián Szifron conjures up a delectable and devilish set of stories mostly based around the themes of obsession and revenge.  It opens with a breath-taking little prologue featuring a horrific incident on a plane and culminates in arguably the wildest tale when the Bride goes on the rampage at her wedding.  Everyone’s favourite Argentinian actor Ricardo Darin pops up in the middle as an explosives expert who enacts revenge on City Parking fascists. I love the whole thing as the film delivers a full deck of twists that master of the macabre Roald Dahl would be proud of.