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TO BOLDLY REVIEW #8 – STAR TREK: NEXT GENERATION (1989 – 1990)– SEASON 3

TO BOLDLY REVIEW #8 – STAR TREK: NEXT GENERATION (1989 – 1990)– SEASON 3

Based on Star Trek & Created by: Gene Roddenberry

Season 3 writers (selected): Michael Piller, Michael Wagner, Melinda Snodgrass, Richard Manning, Ronald D. Moore, David Kemper, Hannah Louise Shearer, Sam Rolfe, Robin Bernheim, Richard Danus, Ed Zuckerman, Joseph Stefano, Rene Echevarria, David Bischoff, Sally Caves, Susan Sackett, Hans Beimler, etc.

Season 3 directors (selected): Jonathan Frakes, Winrich Kolbe, Rob Bowman, Robert Becker, Les Landau, Robert Scheerer, Joseph L. Scanlan, Cliff Bole, Robert Legato, Tom Benko, Chip Chalmers, Timothy Bond, David Carson, Gabrielle Beaumont, etc.

Main Cast: Patrick Stewart, Jonathan Frakes, LeVar Burton, Whoopi Goldberg, Colm Meaney, Michael Dorn, Marina Sirtis, Brent Spiner, Wil Wheaton, Gates McFadden, John De Lancie, Dwight Schultz etc.

Music/Composers: Alexander Courage, Jerry Goldsmith, Dennis McCarthy, Ron Jones, Jay Chattaway

Production Company(s): Paramount Television, CBS Television

**THIS REVIEW CONTAINS SPOILERS**



Thus, my ongoing viewing project of watching ALL the Star Trek series and films in order of release date continues. I have already covered the pro-genesis of STAR TREK: THE NEXT GENERATION here. So, I won’t cover the same ground again. With Season 3 we saw the return of Gates McFadden as Doctor Beverly Crusher, replacing the sterner virtues of Doctor Pulaski. Other than that, the established crew of the Enterprise were all present and correct.

The season as a whole continued, and even improved, the consistent qualities of Season 2. Indeed, there was a great balance between romantic, comedic, dramatic, tragic, action and sci-fi genre storylines. The appearances of Romulans, Klingons and the Ferengi further cemented their place in Star Trek lore. Yet, there was also space in the bumper twenty-six episodes for new species, beings and aliens to appear. Plus, not forgetting the return of that very formidable foe, The Borg.

I especially thought the narrative balance was very good throughout. All the Enterprise crew got episodes dedicated to their characters and a chance to shine individually and as part of the ensemble. We also got some fine guest appearances as new characters were introduced. Anyway, here are six episodes from Season 3 that I particularly enjoyed.


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THE VENGEANCE FACTOR – EPISODE 9

Here Riker finds himself romantically entwined as Picard attempts to broker peace between two factions hellbent on a blood feud. I enjoyed it because of the murder mystery aspect. Also, Jonathan Frakes impressed as Riker in the leading romantic hero role.


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THE HUNTED – EPISODE 11

This fast-paced and action-packed episode found the crew meeting their match, as they face off against a genetically enhanced soldier portrayed by Jeffrey McCarthy. With echoes of Universal Soldier (1992), the episode has emotional depth too because it explores the disregard of veteran soldiers by the ruling classes once war is over.


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YESTERDAY’S ENTERPRISE – EPISODE 15

The writers deserves a lot of praise for constructing such an imaginative and intelligent alternative-timeline narrative. A rift in space and time creates another version of the Enterprise. In this timeline war rages with the Klingons and moreover reveals Tasha Yar (Denise Crosby) to still be alive. Only Guinan (Whoopi Goldberg) senses something isn’t right and what ensues is a complex story; thoroughly enjoyable from both plot and emotional perspectives.


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THE OFFSPRING – EPISODE 16

One of the big story questions that hung over the series for me was: why didn’t they try and replicate Data in some way? This concept is explored in this very moving episode when he constructs another android called, Lal (Hallie Todd). Brett Spiner is on great form as Data faces a difficult choice,; having to choose between his “daughter” and Starfleet regulations.


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SINS OF THE FATHER – EPISODE 17

Any episode with Lt. Worf (Michael Dorn) as the lead protagonist is always intriguing. Here Worf must face potential death in defending his family honour against the Klingon High Council. Tony Todd appears as Worf’s brother and the chance to further explore Klingon culture amidst a conspiracy plot leads to a really good episode.


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THE BEST OF BOTH WORLDS – PART 1 – EPISODE 26

I can only imagine what emotions the Star Trek fans felt at the time when they witnessed Jean Luc Picard’s transformation into the Borg known as Locutus. In what must be one of the greatest cliff-hanger TV moments of all time, this episode had strong writing and incredible conflict. The addition of Elizabeth Dennehy to the crew of the Enterprise, as the ambitious and formidable, Lt. Commander Shelby, also added to the overall quality of this brilliant episode.


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“YOU’RE FIRED!” – SOME GREAT TV/CINEMA SACKINGS

“YOU’RE FIRED!”  – SOME GREAT TV/CINEMA SACKINGS

“I was looking for a job and then I found a job. Heaven knows I’m miserable now!” Stephen Patrick Morrissey

**CONTAINS MILD SPOILERS**

Cinema and television is often about reflection. What happens on screen reflects the dreams or loves or nightmares or hates of the audience.  There is no greater scene in a movie I love more than a good sacking or resignation scene. Indeed, I’ve had many jobs I’ve hated. I’ve had many jobs which hated me. Plus, in my “career” as a wageslave I’ve been constructively dismissed, made redundant and resigned from various places of employment.

So, when I see it occur on screen I thrill at the idea of a character NOT being in work; of leaving employment; of being free and damning the consequences. Of course, this is all wish fulfilment and projection as I am a responsible person and continue to punch the clock. Nontheless, if you have a desire for a certain level of existence and especially if you have children you need to pay your way.  But a sucker can dream and have the mirage of hope play out on a big screen. For your consideration I have pushed, filed, stamped, indexed, briefed, de-briefed, and ordered some cracking sacking or resignations scenes from television and film.

For your consideration I have pushed, filed, stamped, indexed, briefed, de-briefed, and ordered some cracking sacking or resignations scenes from television and film.

AMERICAN BEAUTY (1999)

This brilliant ensemble drama confirmed Kevin Spacey as an actor of some force and the scene where he turns the tables on his boss in just magnificent. I also love it when he’s interviews for the job at the fast food place because he wants a job with as little responsibility as possible.  A mid-life crisis has never been so much fun!

BOYS FROM THE BLACKSTUFF (1982)

A tragic and darkly comic “poster-man” for Thatcher’s Britain, Yosser Hughes became synonymous with the catchphrase “Gissa job!” A pale, ghost of a man who would essentially get hired and fired on the spot due to his uncontrollable anger and violence. The whole series is classic British TV at its best and in Yosser’s Story I’m both laughing and crying inside at the same time.

BRIDESMAIDS (2011)

I’ve used this scene before on a previous blog item about great dialogue scenes and happy to use it here again. Kristen Wiig and the teenage nemesis exchange verbal blows ending in a cracking payoff right at the end. The scene has wonderful performances and cracking comic timing as they take the comedy staple of battling one-up-woman-ship right up to eleven.

“DO I NOT LIKE THAT!” ITV DOCUMENTARY (1994)

One of the greatest sporting documentaries ever!  The tragi-comedy of Graham Taylor’s ill-fated attempt to get England to the 1994 World Cup is a brutally honest and painful to watch.  Taylor is a fine football man but this whole documentary is one big sacking waiting to happen. David Brent doesn’t manage football teams; but if he did.

FIGHT CLUB (1999)

One of my favourite films of all time this is a wonderful, wonderful scene which captures the mood and violence of the thematics in a heartbeat.  Smashing yourself up AND blaming your boss is just a magnificent way to leave a job. Awesome!

THE HUDSUCKER PROXY (1994)

While not one of the Coen Bros more celebrated films The Hudsucker Proxy has many wonderful visual tricks up its sleeve. The opening set-piece where the Chairman of the Board “resigns” is a wonderfully constructed sequence edited and shot with their usual flair, humour and precision.

KILL BILL: VOL. TWO (2004)

I really felt sorry for Michael Madsen’s Bud in this scene.  Here’s a guy who is a part of infamous assassin team called The Viper Squad, in a deadbeat backwater town bouncing to make ends meet with a coked-up-douche-bag-boss to boot. For being late he is catigated in the most humiliating way and yet doesn’t react.  Perhaps he’s above it all but I really wanted Bud to thump his scumbag boss but he just takes it and walks out.

NEED FOR SPEED (2014)

Great driving and car stunts do not save this video-game adaptation from being an also-ran as a narrative. However it does have a very memorable resignation scene which transplants some much needed humour in the over-serious petrol-headed plot.  Here mechanic Fin quits his job in hilarious fashion.

NETWORK (1976)

“I’m mad as hell!”  Stunning Paddy Chayefsky script holds a burning mirror up to the news media governed by a desire for ratings in Network. The film reflects flaming ire and wide-eyed fury via Peter Finch’s Howard Beale who not only is under threat of the sack but actually promises to “resign” permanently on live television.  It’s a stunning film which in many ways is just, if not more, relevant today.

THE OFFICE (2001-2003)

Even though he probably deserved his sacking/redundancy for his somewhat eccentric management style I still felt sorry for David Brent. His self-delusion knows no bounds as he offers his resignation believing him to be irreplaceable only to find it accepted by the management.  It’s made all the more amusing because he’s adorned in ridiculous fancy dress for Comic Relief. Priceless.

THE PRISONER (1967 -1968)

This TV show from the 1960s is an enigmatic masterpiece. Set in the mysterious Village we follow one-can-only-presume-a-former-spy called Number 6 (Patrick McGoohan) as he attempts to escape from his nefarious captors. Kafkaesque to the extreme it begins with one of the great resignation/credit sequences ever.

“BE SEEING YOU…”